External Publications

Do country sizes matter? What motivates China’s trade decision in Southern Africa? I 2017


largecoverPublished by Journal of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies

This paper analyses the trade internationalization location decisions of Chinese trade in Southern African Development Community (SADC) from 2001 to 2014, using a generalized mixed model. Market-seeking determinants are first evaluated on Chinese trade data to observe their impact on SADC economy, and then we apply the mixture model to sort country clusters based on their posterior probability.

Author: Emmanuel Igbinoba

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A Chinese company’s investment strategy in South Africa: the case of Hisense I 2016


1 Published by Die ERDE

Hisense, a Chinese home appliance manufacturer, entered South Africa’s TV market in 1996 and the company has since expanded its operations. Now Hisense is one of the major players in the TV market in South Africa. The company’s success can be measured through a mix of the four P’s of marketing: price, product, promotion and place (distribution). The successful combination of strategies helped Hisense penetrate South Africa’s TV market and acquire a growing market share. As a result, Hisense has contributed to export-led economic growth, technology transfer and job creation, among other development-related benefits to the host country. However, at the same time Hisense has faced challenges including problems with labour relations, e.g. poor working conditions and violations of minimum wage regulations. Most of these problems are recurring issues. This shows that overcoming these challenges is not an easy task for Chinese investors operating in South Africa or elsewhere in Africa, and questions remain regarding whether Chinese investment can contribute to fostering Africa’s industrialisation as well as China’s soft power.

Author: Yejoo Kim

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GROWTH REGIMES IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA: A MIXTURE MODEL APPROACH I 2016

Publisicef_journalhed by INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ECONOMICS AND FINANCE STUDIES 

This paper is an attempt to investigate the impact of Chinese trade on the economic growth of Nigeria over the period 1996 to 2012. Employing a modified Solow model, empirical analysis is applied to test the null hypothesis that there is no positive relationship between Chinese trade and Nigerian economic growth. Generalized Linear model and Cointegration techniques are employed to analyze both short run and long run effects. Results show that Chinese trade has significant effects on Nigeria’s economic growth. Thus, there is a need for Nigeria to review and enact new policies between Nigeria and China to further enhance economic growth in the long run.

Author: Emmanuel Igbinoba

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China, Africa’s New Colonial Master? I 2016

GJCST-LOGO

Published by Global Journals Inc.

This paper is an attempt to investigate the impact of Chinese trade on the economic growth of Nigeria over the period 1996 to 2012. Employing a modified Solow model, empirical analysis is applied to test the null hypothesis that there is no positive relationship between Chinese trade and Nigerian economic growth. Generalized Linear model and Cointegration techniques are employed to analyze both short run and long run effects. Results show that Chinese trade has significant effects on Nigeria’s economic growth. Thus, there is a need for Nigeria to review and enact new policies between Nigeria and China to further enhance economic growth in the long run.

Author: Emmanuel Igbinoba

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Book Review: Africa and China – How Africans and their governments are shaping relations with China

SA Journal of international affairs imagePublished by the South African Journal of International Affairs

Africa and China – How Africans and their governments are shaping relations with China, by A W Gadzala (ed), Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield, 2015, 266 pp., $85, ISBN 978-1-4422-3775-9

The central premise uniting the contributions to this volume is the role of African agency in the China–Africa relationship. Within the broader discourse on China– Africa relations, critiques on the lack of African agency are frequent. In terms of policy and development practitioners, as well as the investment community, African agency often refers to how the African side can better facilitate Chinese investments through ‘best practices’ (i.e. less corruption, less bureaucracy, fewer taxes, better environmental standards, beneficiation, etc.). Within more academic debates, the question of agency critically portrays Africa as the passive recipient of Chinese economic and political engagement. [Read full book review here]

Author : Ross Anthony